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Browsers and AI PCs (Read 917 times)
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Re: Browsers and AI PCs
Reply #45 - 06/25/24 at 04:18:54
 

AI PC as a class is approaching closer to a definition point, but the rub is Microsoft and Intel still have different takes on what that definition is going to be.

The rest of the "leaders" of the AI PC movement are also chasing their own takes on what AI PC is going to be.

"40 to 100 trillion operations per second of programmable AI processor power" says that whatever it is will be able to do co-processing at levels never seen before.    However, getting software activities in place to use all this processing power is going to be hard to coordinate apart from Intel and Micosoft agreeing on what is going to be what.

The phone boys are ringing in now, and they have so much greater market share as to simply say "it will be this way" and so it shall be.   That is if they can agree upon what they want .......

We are at least a year out from being ready to buy anything .......

This thirst for gaining some sort of advantage for your company means folks agreeing on a standard is sorta unlikely.
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« Last Edit: 06/26/24 at 08:27:42 by Oldfeller--FSO »  

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Re: Browsers and AI PCs
Reply #46 - 06/26/24 at 03:52:02
 

Processor ERRORS and marketing missteps take place on both sides.

Intel has problems with their latest AI PC processors having a performance killer bug in the microcode.  So far, this bug is seen an un-fixable bug that will require a factory microcode change at the minimum to fix it (i.e. a freshly built processor made with the fix integral to it).  

Think of something on the order of Meltdown or Specter for severity and size.

No processors with this error have left Intel's control, so this mess is controllable but will entail yet another delay for Intel's first market entry.   Qualcomm and Samsung are already out there using ARM based processors, so this screw up further re-enforces Intel's non-leader position in AI PC space.


===================================================


AMD has been caught by review houses overstating some of their metrics and basic performance results on several new processors.  Updated test drivers are promised from AMD to fix these overstatement issues as they only affect a few of AMD processors.  

Intel does shite like this routinely on purpose, but AMD historically never does stuff like this at all --  this was likely a test metric error from the testing vendor or a plain old goof on AMD's part.  

Everybody is using AI PC functions at some level with their newest processors, but expecting equal results from test suites using different set ups and different types of processors is simply asking a bit too much so early in the changeover.

Still, as all the players hustle to get over their starting line AI PC bobbles that are certainly being made on both sides --- then you have to throw on top of the steaming heap the simply ill defined operating standards for AI PC in general and the risk levels for buying right now rise above acceptable levels every which way you go.

Still, the early results say AI PC works faster on some items by a whole bunch of a lot ......
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« Last Edit: 07/02/24 at 09:15:08 by Oldfeller--FSO »  

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Re: Browsers and AI PCs
Reply #47 - 07/09/24 at 11:20:55
 

Intel has begun to unravel a bit more yet again.   It no longer leads in technology, nor in market leadership, nor in manufacturing.

However, because of the Wintel contractual locks on all the large box vendors far more complete PC machines are being built using Intel processors.  However on the flip side technologically, far far more build it yourself enthusiast machines are currently built using AMD processors.

WINTEL does not have a winning formula for AI PC just yet ---- MS is having to drop some key AI features because of huge security risks and the Intel processors have large scale security bugs and sub par performance issues as well.

AI PC is here, right now, but it is currently being driven by  Qualcomm built ARM base processors more than "Intel anything" at the moment.

https://www.computerworld.com/article/2514506/copilot-ai-pcs-are-finally-here...

Click and read this, there are many many issues with ARM based AI PCs released just recently.

Copilot+ AI PCs are finally here. You don’t want one — yet
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« Last Edit: 07/10/24 at 17:41:02 by Oldfeller--FSO »  

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Re: Browsers and AI PCs
Reply #48 - 07/10/24 at 17:46:09
 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/2514506/copilot-ai-pcs-are-finally-here...


The promise of these new devices is that they’d herald the arrival of AI tools to the Windows masses. That’s not really the case right now.

The AI hype just keeps on coming.

The latest news is the arrival of an entirely new line of Windows computers, Copilot+ PCs, which are specifically designed with artificial intelligence (AI) in mind. Microsoft claims they’ll dramatically speed up AI, offer new features unavailable to other PCs, and deliver improved battery life. The new machines point the way to the future of Windows and of AI, if the company is to be believed.

Laptops from Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP, Lenovo, Samsung, and Microsoft were released several weeks ago, long enough to find out how they perform in real life. So how do they stack up? Are they everything Microsoft claimed they would be, or just one more overhyped new technology?

To find out, let’s start by looking at Microsoft’s promises about what the Copilot+ PCs will do. In a blog post announcing them, the company crows:

“Copilot+ PCs are the fastest, most intelligent Windows PCs ever built. With powerful new silicon capable of an incredible 40+ TOPS (trillion operations per second), all–day battery life and access to the most advanced AI models, Copilot+ PCs will enable you to do things you can’t on any other PC. Easily find and remember what you have seen in your PC with Recall, generate and refine AI images in near real-time directly on the device using Cocreator, and bridge language barriers with Live Captions, translating audio from 40+ languages into English. “

The laptops are based on Qualcomm Arm-based processors, which include a neural processing unit (NPU) to handle AI-related tasks. Normally, AI processing occurs in the cloud rather than on a local PC, potentially slowing things down AI. On Copilot+ PCs, Microsoft claims, much of that processing will stay local on the machine.

Recalling Recall
Microsoft went into hype overdrive when touting the new machines’ Recall feature. There’s good reason for that. Anyone who has spent too much time trying to remember and open a specific email, website or file they worked on months ago would want it — and that pretty much means all of us. It’s clearly the killer app that could sell countless Copilot+ PCs.

But Recall has an Achilles heel. As I wrote earlier, it could be the ultimate security and privacy nightmare. It works by constantly taking screenshots of everything you do, storing them on your PC, creating a searchable database of them, and then using AI tools on them so you can find what you want quickly.

Initially, Microsoft claimed that because all that work is done locally rather than in the cloud, it wouldn’t lead to privacy or security issues. But many security researchers and analysts disagree.


Jeff Pollard, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester, told Computerworld “I think a built-in keylogger and screen-shotter that perfectly captures everything you do on the machine within a certain time frame is a tremendous privacy nightmare for users.”


If a hacker gains access to your PC, researchers found, he or she can read the database, which isn’t even encrypted. At first, Microsoft tried to convince everyone that the privacy issues were much ado about nothing. But then it backed off. The company announced in a blog post that the feature won’t be available on Copilot+ PCs when they launch. Microsoft says it will make Recall available some day — though it won’t say when.

That means the biggest reason for buying a Copilot+ at the moment remains elusive.

Other Copilot+ PC woes
These machines have other issues, too. One of the most head-scratching ones is that the Copilot app on Copilot+ PCs appears to be less powerful than the app on traditional PCs. On Copilot+ PCs, Copilot runs as a traditional Windows app rather than as a sidebar pane, as it now normally does on traditional PCs. So, you can resize it, move it around the screen, and do anything with it that you can do with any window.

That’s not the problem. The problem is that Microsoft also took away some Copilot features. When run as a sidebar pane, Copilot can perform some basic Windows tasks for you, such as turning dark mode on or off. The app on Copilot+ PCs can’t do that. (By the way, Copilot as a Windows app is now also available for non-Copilot+ PCs, and it has the same problem as the Windows app on Copilot+ PCs.)

Another oddity: Although the new Copilot+ PCs have a dedicated Copilot key, the PCs won’t allow you to launch Copilot with the keyboard shortcut Windows key-C as you can on other PCs. Go figure.

And there’s more, according to Computerworld and PC World contributor Chris Hoffman. On the new machines, he says, “Copilot doesn’t run offline or use the new integrated neural processing unit (NPU) hardware to do anything at all.”

Running AI offline was one of the big promises of the new line. Perhaps someday that will happen, but as Hoffman notes, that day isn’t yet upon us.

Emulation: Thumbs up or thumbs down?
Because Copilot+ PCs run Windows on an Arm chip, they have to run Windows apps via emulation. Theoretically, that could be problematic or slow apps down. Microsoft contends that the chips are so fast that the apps run fine.

Not everyone agrees. Many reviewers generally report no serious problems, but Android Authority warns: “emulation is hit-and-miss.”

PC World’s Mark Hachman found that most apps work fine, with one big caveat: “There’s a good chance your favorite games won’t even run” on a Copilot+ PC.

The upshot
So, should you buy one of these machines? I won’t hem and haw. The answer is no. Their two most important AI-related features — Recall and local AI processing — aren’t yet available. And running games on one, if that’s a priority, is iffy at best.


There are plenty of very good thin, powerful Windows laptops out there. If you need a new PC, buy one of those, not a Copilot+ PC. Even if you’re looking for true AI power, you’d do better to wait.
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« Last Edit: Yesterday at 15:15:41 by Oldfeller--FSO »  

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